WELL: Week 1

One of my goals for 2018 is to pass the WELL AP exam. The WELL certification system is similar to the LEED certification system; however rather than rating a building in terms of environmental measures, it regards human health measures. I would say that in the next three years, WELL will be as major as LEED. The rating systems are quite symbiotic, so if a building gets credits for one system, likely it will receive credit for the other.

Buildings may be certified in these systems. People may be accredited in these systems. I passed my LEED AP BD+C and ND exams in 2014 and 2015. 2018 is the year I get my WELL AP accreditation. In preparation, I have split up the information. I have based my study schedule upon the seven Concepts (further broken down into 102 Features) of the system. I will focus on the Features within each concept for one week. The Concepts are:

  • Water
  • Nourishment
  • Fitness
  • Mind
  • Comfort
  • Light
  • Air

I was able to list that without referencing a handbook. Sometimes, it is the little victories.


 


shirt (vintage) // pajama pants (alternate colorway) // notebook // pencil jar // pencils // pens // zipper pouch // sticky note set // candle // dry erase markers


This past week I studied Water. The Features within Water are the following:

30. Fundamental Water Quality

    • Water intended for human consumption must meet the following:
      • Part 1: Turbidity must be less than 0.3 NTUs.
      • Part 2: Zero amount of coliforms (including e. coli)

31. Inorganic Contaminants

  • Filters
    • reverse osmosis (RO) systems
    • kinetic degredation fluxion (KDF) filters
  • Part 1: Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits for each of the following dissolved metals:
    • Copper —> 1.0 mg/L
    • Nickel —> 0.012 mg/L
    • Lead —> 0.01 mg/L
    • Arsenic —> 0.01 mg/L
    • Antimony —> 0.006 mg/L
    • Mercury —> 0.002 mg/L

32. Organic Contaminants

  • Activated carbon filters
  • Part 1: Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits for each of the following dissolved metals:
    • Xylenes —> 0.5 mg/L
    • Ethylbenzene —> 0.3 mg/L
    • Toluene —> 0.15 mg/L
    • Benzene  —> 0.001 mg/L
    • Vinyl chloride —> 0.002 mg/L
    • Tetracholorethylene —> 0.005 mg/L
    • Polychlorinated biphenyls —> 0.0005 mg/L
    • Styrene —> 0.0005 mg/L

33. Agricultural Contaminants

  • Part 1: Herbicides and Pesticides // Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • 2.4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid  —> 0.07 mg/L
    • Glyphosate —> 0.70 mg/L
    • Simazine  —> 0.002 mg/L
    • Atrazine —> 0.001 mg/L
  • Part 2: Fertilizers // Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • Nitrates  —> 10 mg/L

34. Public Water Additives

  • Part 1: Disinfectants // Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • Residual chlorine  —> 0.6 mg/L
    • Residual chloramine  —> 4.0 mg/L
  • Part 2: Disinfectant Byproducts // Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • Total trihalomethanes  —> 0.08 mg/L
    • Total haloacetic acids  —> 0.06 mg/L
  • Part 2: Fluoride// Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • Fluoride  —> 4.0 mg/L

35. Periodic Water Quality Testing

  • Part 1: Quarterly Testing // Water intended for human consumption is tested quarterly for the presence of dissolved metals / metalloids.
    • Lead
    • Arsenic
    • Mercury
    • Copper
  • Part 2: Water Data Record Keeping and Response // Written policy including the following:
    • Detailed enforcement strates for monitoring / recording water quality parameters listed in teh WELL Building Standard
    • Records are kept from a minimum of three years, including data from field inspections and lab results
    • Action / remediation plans for any unacceptable results

36. Water Treatment

  • Part 1: Organic Chemical Removal // Water intended for human consumption and showers/baths is treated with the following:
    • Activated carbon filter
  • Part 2: Sediment Filter // Water intended for human consumption and showers/baths is treated with the following:
    • Filter rated to remove suspended solids with pore size of 1.5 micrometer (μm) or less
  • Part 3: Microbial Elimination // Water intended for human consumption and showers/baths is treated with the following:
    • UVGI water sanitation
    • Filter Rated by the NSF to remove microbial cysts
  • Part 4: Water Quality Maintenance // To verify that the selected filtration / samiltation system chosen continues to operate as designed, projects must annually provide the IWBI with:
    • Record keeping for 3 years, including evidence that the filter and/or sanitizer has been properly maintained as per the manufacturer’s recommendation
  • Part 5: Legionella Control // A point-by-point narrative describing how the building addressed Legionella, and includes the following:
    • Team for legionella management in the building
    • Water system inventory and production of process flow diagrams
    • Hazard analysis of water asserts
    • Identification of critical control points
    • Maintenance and control measures, monitoring, establishment of performance limits and corrective actions

37. Drinking Water Promotion

  1. Part 1: Drinking Water Taste Properties // Water intended for human consumption must not exceed the following limits:
    • Total Dissolved Solids —> 500 mg/L
    • Sodium —> 270 mg/L
    • Sulfate —> 250 mg/L
    • Chloride —> 250 mg/L
    • Zinc —> 5 mg/L
    • Iron —> 0.3 mg/L
    • Aluminum —> 0.2 mg/L
    • Manganese —> 0.05 mg/L
  2. Part 2: Drinking Water Access // To encourage consumption, the following is met:
    • At least one dispense is located within 30 meters / 100 feet of all parts of regularly occupied floor space
    • Minimum one dispenser per floor
  3. Part 3: Water Dispenser Maintenance // Components of dispensers that provide water for human consumption are cleaned with at least the following regularity:
    • Daily, for mouthpieces, protective guards, and collective basins to prevent lime and calcium build-up
    • Quarterly, for outlet screens and aerators, to remove debris and sediment

One thought on “WELL: Week 1

  1. Pingback: WELL: Week 3

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